A review of electroretinography waveforms

A review of electroretinography waveforms

Electroretinography (ERG) is a commonly used technique to study retinal function in
both clinical and research ophthalmology. ERG responses can be divided into component
waveforms, analysis of which can provide insight into the health and function
of different types and populations of retinal cells. In dogs, ERG has been used in the
characterization of normal retinal function, as well as the diagnosis of retinal diseases
and measuring effects of treatment. While many components of the recorded waveform
are similar across species, dogs have several notable features that should be
differentiated from the responses in humans and other animals. Additionally, modifications
of standard protocols, such as changing flash frequency and stimulus color,
and mathematical models of ERG waveforms have been used in studies of human
retinal function but have been infrequently applied to visual electrophysiology in
dogs. This review provides an overview of the origins and applications of ERG in
addition to potential avenues for further characterization of responses in the dog.